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    Displaying items by tag: RNA

    13-researchersc-gene-targeting-rosa26-feeder-cells-human-primary-cells-mef cells-rat

    A computational model developed by researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute is the first to accurately simulate the complex twists of a short sequence of RNA as it folds into a critical hairpin structure known as a "tetraloop." The research, published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is a glimpse into RNA, found in all life on Earth, and could advance a variety of research areas, including the search for new antibiotics and cures for protein-related diseases.
    Existing computational models, based on DNA rather than RNA, do not achieve the atomic level accuracy of the new model, said Angel Garcia, head of the Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy within the School of Science at Rensselaer, and senior constellation chaired professor in the Biocomputation and Bioinformatics Constellation, who co-wrote the paper with Alan Chen, a post-doctoral fellow at Rensselaer. The new model Garcia and Chen created can simulate the folding of three known versions of a tetraloop, accurate to within one ten-billionth of a meter.
    RNA is involved in many biological functions, such as building proteins, coding and decoding genes, and cellular regulation. RNA molecules are composed of strings of four different "bases" —cytosine, guanine, adenine, and uracil—mounted on a sugar-phosphate backbone. Once the sequence is assembled, the individual bases interact with their neighbors, twisting and swinging on the hinged chemical bonds that connect them to the backbone. When the process is complete, the RNA has folded into its "tertiary" structure, which influences its function. Although researchers can easily alter the sequence of molecules, without accurate computer modeling there they cannot easily see the tertiary structure of their creation.
    "Right now, it takes people from molecular biologists, to virologists, to cell biologists, thousands of dollars and years of study to see the structure of an RNA they have made, altered, or are studying," said Chen. "There are a lot of researchers working on the RNA in viruses and how it attacks the cell, and, while they're easily able to alter the sequence, they're essentially working without ever seeing the effects of their changes in molecular detail. Because of this, there's a lot of trial and error, and our work aimed at helping that."
    Garcia and Chen said that, unlike DNA, which typically twists two strands of bases into a classic double-helix, RNA is single-stranded and folds onto itself, forming many unusual structures. A tetraloop is a small section of single-stranded RNA that is looped into the shape of a hairpin, the curve of which is formed by four bases. Even the sequence of bases in a tetraloop is unusual, violating a standard arrangement described by groundbreaking DNA researchers James Watson and Francis Crick.
    To create an effective computational model, Garcia and Chen had to match the unique "recipe" of twisting and swinging proscribed by the interactions between the bases.
    "Imagine if you try to produce a recipe of Mario Batali," said Garcia, referring to a popular chef. "I tell you it has water, salt, fish, and pasta—go produce his recipe. The problem is, you don't know how much of each, and in what order."
    Instead of a recipe of food ingredients, Garcia and Chen created a computational recipe for the interactions of the bases in the sequence of a tetraloop.
    "The problem is one of balancing different forces. It's the actions between the bases as they stack on top of each other, the interactions of the bases with water, the rotation of the bases relative to a sugar. Those are things that change the balance," said Garcia.
    Garcia said tetraloops are an important area of study because they appear in all organisms, particularly in ribosomes, which manufacture proteins for living cells. Statistically, there could be as many as 256 possible sequences of those four bases, but only three sequences actually appear in tetraloops. Once formed, they are highly stable, outlasting other structures when subjected to the destructive force of increasing heat.
    "Tetraloops are sequences which are highly conserved throughout evolution; you find them everywhere, from bacteria to humans," said Garcia. "From one organism to another, many things can change, but when tetraloops change, they change from one sequence of four bases to one of the other three. They stack against each other and they are hyperstable. And there is a reason for them to be arranged the way they are."

    Published in News
    Friday, 02 August 2013 17:00

    Blood test to detect Alzheimer's early

    microrna-gene-targeting-rosa26-feeder-cells-human-primary-cells-mef cells-rat-knock-out-stem-cell-characterization-teratoma-formation-embryoid-body

    Disease develops years before the first symptoms appear

    Scientists have developed a simple blood test that can help identify Alzheimer's disease.

    Experts are of the opinion that the method will likely lead to a revolutionary breakthrough in the fight against the disease, since the only way used before her diagnosis at necropsy.

    The disease can begin a decade before her first experience symptoms such as confusion and memory loss.

    Scientists from the University of Saarland in Germany focused its attention on microRNA - small molecules contained in body fluids and influence the expression of genes.

    The team determined that the levels are different microRNA in individual patients affected by Alzheimer's disease.

    The results were published in Genome Biology

    Published in News

    Important new research from UMass Medical School demonstrates how exosomes shuttle proteins from neurons to muscle cells where they take part in critical signaling mechanisms, an exciting discovery that means these tiny vehicles could one day be loaded with therapeutic agents, such as RNA interference (RNAi), and directly target disease-carrying cells.

    The study, published this month in the journal Neuron, is the first evidence that exosomes can transfer membrane proteins that play an important role in cell-to-cell signaling in the nervous system.

    "There has been a long-held belief that certain cellular materials, such as integral membrane proteins, are unable to pass from one cell to another, essentially trapping them in the cell where they are made," said Vivian Budnik, PhD, professor of neurobiology and lead author of the study. "What we've shown in this study is that these cellular materials can actually move between different cell types by riding in the membrane of exosomes.

    "What is so exciting about this discovery is that these exosomes can deliver materials from one cell, over a distance, to a very specific and different cell," said Dr. Budnik. "Once inside the recipient cell, the materials contained in the exosome can influence or perform processes in the new cell. This raises the enticing possibility that exosomes can be packed with gene therapies, such as RNAi, and delivered to diseased cells where they could have a therapeutic effect for people."

    Discovered in the mid-80s, exosomes have only recently attracted the attention of scientists at large, according to Budnik. Exosomes are small vesicles containing cellular materials such as microRNA, messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and proteins, packaged inside larger, membrane-bound bodies called multivesicular bodies (MVBs) inside cells. When MVBs containing exosomes fuse with the cell plasma membrane, they release these exosome vesicles into the extracellular space. Once outside the cell, exosomes can then travel to other cells, where they are taken up. The recipient cells can then use the materials contained within exosomes, influencing cellular function and allowing the recipient cell to carry out certain processes that it might not be able to complete otherwise.

    Budnik and colleagues made this startling discovery while investigating how the synapses at the end of neurons and nearby muscle cells communicate in the developing Drosophila fruit fly to form the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). The NMJ is essential for transmitting electrical signals between neurons and muscles, allowing the organism to move and control important physiological processes. Alterations of the NMJ can lead to devastating diseases, such as muscular dystrophy and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Understanding how the NMJ develops and is maintained is important for human health.

    As organisms develop, the synapse and muscle cell need to grow in concert. If one or the other grows too quickly or not quickly enough, it could have dire consequences for the ability of the organism to move and survive. To coordinate development, signals are sent from the neuron to the muscle cell (anterograde signals) and from the muscle cell to the neuron (retrograde signals). However, the identity of these signals and how their release is coordinated is poorly understood.

    Normally, the vesicle protein Synaptotagmin 4 (Syt4) is found in both the synapse and the muscle cells. Previous knockout experiments eliminating the Syt4 protein from Drosophila have resulted in stunted NMJs. Suspecting that Syt4 played an important role in retrograde signaling at the developing NMJ, Budnik and colleagues used knockdown experiments to decrease Syt4 protein levels in either the neurons or the muscle cells. Surprisingly, when RNAi was used to knockdown Syt4 in the neurons alone, Syt4 protein was eliminated in both neurons and muscles. The opposite was not the case. When Syt4 was knocked down in muscle cells only, there was no change in the levels of Syt4 in either muscles or neurons.

    To confirm this, Budnik and colleagues inserted a Syt4 gene into the neurons of a Drosophila mutant completely lacking the normal protein. This restored Syt4 in both neurons and muscle cells. Further experiments suggested that the only source of Syt4 is the neuron. These observations were consistent with the model that Syt4 is actually transferred from neurons to muscle cells. As a transmembrane protein, however, Syt4 was thought to be unable to move from one cell to another through traditional avenues. How the Syt4 protein was moving from neuron to muscle cell was unclear.

    Knowing that exosomes had been observed to carry transmembrane proteins in other systems and from their own work on the Drosophila NMJ, Budnik and colleagues began testing to see if exosomes could be the vehicle responsible for carrying Syt4 form neurons to muscles. "We had previously observed that it was possible to transfer transmembrane proteins across the NMJ through exosomes, a process also observed in the immune system," said Budnik. "We suspect this was how Syt4 was making its way from the neuron to the muscle."

    When exosomes were purified from cultured cells containing Syt4, they found that exosomes indeed contained Syt4. In addition, when these purified exosomes were applied to cultured muscle cells from fly embryos, these cells were able to take up the purified Syt4 exosomes. Taken together, these findings indicate that Syt4 plays a critical role in the signaling process between synapse and muscle cell that allows for coordinated development of the NMJ. While Syt4 is required to release a retrograde signal from muscle to neuron, a component of this retrograde signal must be supplied from the neuron to the muscle. This establishes a positive feedback loop that ensures coordinated growth of the NMJ. Equally important is the finding that this feedback mechanism is enabled by the use of exosomes, which can shuttle transmembrane proteins across cells.

    "While this discovery greatly enhances our understanding of how the neural muscular junction develops and works, it also has tremendous promise as a potential vector for targeted genetic therapies," said Budnik. "More work needs to be done, but this study significantly supports the possibility that exosomes could be loaded with therapeutic agents and delivered to specific cells in patients."

    Published in News
    Wednesday, 24 July 2013 09:41

    New front in the war against infection

    proffemaleAlthough not completely destroy bacterial and viral infections, penicillin has been a revolution in medicine and its introduction has saved hundreds of millions of lives in the last century. It was unique for its broad spectrum of activity. But since its introduction in medical practice so far appeared many new, exotic and constantly evolving strains of viruses and bacteria that are terrible for health capability - develop resistance to even our most powerful antibiotics.

    Scientists at the lab "Lincoln" at MIT are about to end this constant race between human antibiotics and antibiotic resistance of microorganisms.
     
    They created a drug that has proven effective against almost all strains of 15 of the most common viruses in the world. Rhinoviruses that cause the common cold, H1N1 flu, stomach viruses, polio virus, dengue fever and other hemorrhagic viruses, causing internal bleeding.

    At present there are few drugs which are effective against specific viruses, such as HIV protease inhibitors controlling agent responsible for AIDS. Unfortunately, they are expensive and often - susceptible to viral resistance. Therefore, the researchers introduced a new approach to the problem - light, which searches and finds the infected cells, not with the virus, and with any type of viral agents. Once localized, these cells are destroyed to prevent the spread of infection.

    When a virus particle infects a cell, it "distracts" cellular structures and makes them subject to one goal: to create more copies of the virus. They leave the cell, often destroying her in the process and invade new cells for the same purpose. During the process of replication, viruses establish long strands of the double-stranded RNA which is not present in human or animal organisms. The human body has a protective mechanism that is triggered by the detection of similar chains, but many viruses are able to evade detection and cause delayed immune response that usually starts too late.

    To prevent this problem, Todd Rider, head of the research group introduced a new strategy against the attackers. According to it, a much more efficient than the current inducing an enhanced immune response would be, if coupled with a protein binding to the foreign RNA of another protein that induces apoptosis - programmed cell death. Similar compounds exist in nature and the team was able to combine them. Because of their natural origin, they are capable of little aid to pass through the cell membranes of all human tissues and cells. When the drug gets into the infected cell, he programmed for self-destruction, but through uninfected cells, this remains intact.

    The drug has been proven non-toxic, and its few side effects do not cause serious health threats. It has already passed laboratory and experimental stage and soon became its clinical trials. If they also succeed, scientists are convinced: up to 3 years the drug could be on the market.
     
    They are proud of their successes achieved so far because they believe they have found a "penicillin of the 21st century."

     

    Published in News
    Thursday, 04 July 2013 10:31

    Stem-cell transplants may purge HIV

    Daniel-KuritzkeTwo men with HIV may have been cured after they received stem-cell transplants to treat the blood cancer lymphoma, their doctors announced today at the International AIDS Society Conference in Kuala Lumpur.

    One of the men received stem-cell transplants to replace his blood-cell-producing bone marrow about three years ago, and the other five years ago. Their regimens were similar to one used on Timothy Ray Brown, the 'Berlin patient' who has been living HIV-free for six years and is the only adult to have been declared cured of HIV. Last July, doctors announced that the two men — the ‘Boston patients’ — appeared to be living without detectable levels of HIV in their blood, but they were still taking antiretroviral medications at that time.

    Timothy Henrich, an HIV specialist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, who helped to treat the men, says that they have now stopped their antiretroviral treatments with no ill effects. One has been off medication for 15 weeks and the other for seven. Neither has any trace of HIV DNA or RNA in his blood, Henrich says.

    If the men stay healthy, they would be the third and fourth patients ever to be cured of HIV, after Brown and a baby in Mississippi who received antiretroviral therapy soon after birth.

    But Henrich and Daniel Kuritzkes, a colleague at Brigham who also worked with the men, caution that it is still too early know whether or not the Boston patients have been cured. For that, doctors will need to follow the men closely for at least a year, because the virus may be hiding out in 'reservoirs' — parts of the men’s bodies, such as their brain or gut, that can harbour the virus for decades.

    “We’re being very careful not to say that these patients are cured,” Kuritzkes says. “But the findings to date are very encouraging.”

    HIV researcher Steven Deeks of the University of California, San Francisco, says that doctors might need to wait at least two years before declaring that a cure has been achieved. “Any evidence that we might be able to cure HIV infection remains a major advance,” Deeks says. But, he adds, “there have been cases of patients who took many weeks off therapy before the virus took off”.

    Exciting news

    Still, researchers and doctors are excited about the news, especially because the Boston patients’ treatment differed from the Berlin patient’s regimen in one key way. Brown was given stem cells that were predisposed to resist HIV infection, because the donor happened to have a mutated version of a key protein — CCR5 — that is needed for HIV to infect cells. So Brown’s transplant was akin to gene therapy with HIV-resistant cells.

    But the Boston patients received stem cells without the protective mutation. The transplanted cells must therefore have been protected from infection by the antiretroviral drugs taken during cancer treatment. Their doctors think that an immune response called graft-versus-host disease — a post-transplant reaction in which donated cells kill off a patient’s own cells — may have then wiped out the patients’ HIV reservoirs, potentially curing the men.

    Transplant specialist Christine Durand of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland, says that the case of the Boston patients may show that current antiretroviral drugs are powerful enough, on their own, to protect the transplanted cells. “If cure has been achieved in the Boston patients, then it was the antiretroviral therapy, not gene therapy, that protected the donor cells,” she says.

    The finding is very important for people with HIV who also need blood-cell transplants, but the treatment is unlikely to be used more generally because the risks from transplants are high. Durand says that Johns Hopkins is now revising its transplant procedures to keep people with both cancer and HIV on antiretroviral drugs during the transplant regimen.

    Separately, the International Maternal Pediatric Adolescent AIDS Clinical Trials (IMPAACT) Group, based in Silver Spring, Maryland, is trying to replicate the Berlin patient’s cure by giving CCR5-mutated HIV-resistant blood from umbilical cords to children and adults with HIV and cancer. 

    Everyone with HIV could benefit from this work, researchers say, because it could yield valuable information about how to eliminate the HIV reservoir.

    “We are still a long way off from a viable cure option for most patients,” Durand says. “But every step counts, and these cases can teach us important lessons.”

     

    Published in News
    Wednesday, 26 June 2013 15:48

    GelRed Nucleic Acid Gel Stain In Water

    Gelred GelgreenGelRed™ is an ultra sensitive, extremely stable and environmentally safe fluorescent nucleic acid dye designed to replace the highly toxic ethidium bromide (EB) for staining dsDNA, ssDNA or RNA in agarose gels or polyacrylamide gels. GelRed is far more sensitive than EB without requiring a destaining step (Figure 1). GelRed and EB have virtually the same spectra (Figure 3), so you can directly replace EB with GelRed without changing your existing imaging system.
    GelRed™ can be used to stain dsDNA, ssDNA or RNA in agarose gel via either precast or post gel staining. GelRed can also be used to stain dsDNA, ssDNA or RNA in polyacrylamide gel via post gel staining. GelRed is also compatible with downstream DNA manipulations such as restriction digest, sequencing, and cloning.
    A series of safety tests have confirmed that GelRedTM is noncytotoxic, nonmutagenic and nonhazardous at concentrations well above the working concentrations used in gel staining. As a result, GelRed can be safely disposed of down the drain or in regular trash, providing convenience and reducing cost in waste disposal.
    We offer GelRed™ 10,000X solution in DMSO and in water (cat#41003) for better safety. For your convenience, we also offer ready-to-use GelRedTM 3X in water (cat#41001) that can be directly used for post gel staining. For customers who look for large pack size, we offer a cost-saving bulk pack size of 10mL (cat#41003-1).

    FEATURES:
    Shown by the Ames test and other tests to be nonmutagenic and noncytotoxic
    Passed environmental safety tests for direct disposal down the drain or in regular trash
    Much more sensitive than EtBr and SYBR Safe
    Available in water, stable at room temperature for long-term storage and microwavable
    - Safer than EB
    - Easy disposal
    - Ultra-sensitive
    - Extremely stable

    Very simple procedures for either precast and post gel staining
    GelRed replaces EtBr with no optical setting change; GelGreen replaces SYBR or GelStar with no optical setting change (see Figure 3)
    Compatible with downstream DNA manipulations such as restriction digest, sequencing and cloning.
    Simple to use
    Perfectly compatible with a standard UV transilluminator
    Perfectly compatible with downstream applications

    gelred3gelred4Figure 1.GelRed™ is significantly more sensitive than ethidium bromide (EB) for detecting low-level DNA, especially in the lower molecular weight area. Shown left are two-fold serial dilutions of 1 Kb Plus DNA Ladder from Invitrogen electrophoresed on 1% agarose gels precasted with GelRed or EB in 1x TBE. The total amount of DNA loaded per lane was: 200 ng, 100 ng, 50 ng and 25 ng from left to right. Gels were imaged using 300-nm transillumination and photographed with an EB filter and Polaroid 667 black-and-white print films.

     

     

    The Most Sensitive and Stable Precast Gel Stain

     

    gelred f2

    Figure 2. GelRed™ displays consistently superior sensitivity for post gel staining, regardless of the filter used (A vs. C) and storage and handling condition. SYBR Gold, however, showed comparable performance only when used fresh from the manufacturer and with a SYBR filter (B vs. D). Following a few freeze-thaw cycles, SYBR Gold 10,000X solution degraded significantly, resulting in poor staining (E). SYBR Gold 1X solution also degrades over time (see Figure 4). Two-fold serial dilutions of 1kb Plus DNA Ladder from Invitrogen were electrophoresed on 1% agarose gels in 1x TBE and post- stained with GelRedTMand SYBR Gold, respectively. Gels were imaged using 300-nm transillumination and photographed with the indicated filters and Polaroid black-and-white print films. The total amount of DNA per lane for each serial dilution was: 200 ng, 100 ng, 50 ng and 25 ng from left to right.

    gelred f3

    Figure 3. Excitation and emission spectra of GelRed and GelGreen in the presence of DNA in PBS buffer

    gelred f4

    Note: *GelRed and its uses are covered by pending US and international patents. **SYBR is trademark of Molecular Probes, Inc. and GelStar is trademark of FMC corporation.
    Please also see our EvaGreen™(cat#31000), a breakthrough nucleic acid dye ideally suited for quantitative real-time PCR(qPCR). By incorporating a smart "release-on-demand" DNA-binding technology, EvaGreen™ has low PCR inhibition while exhibiting superior sensitivity. Similar to our GelRed™, EvaGreenTM has remarkable stability.
    Reference:
    For Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay: 1. Liu,Y.,et al. Biochemistry, DOI: 10.1021/bi902050p, 2010, 2. Konate, K., et al. Biochemistry, DOI: 10.1021/bi901791x, 2010.

    Catalog number : 41003

    Quantity: 0.5

    Price: 180 Euro

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    Published in Promos
    Wednesday, 22 May 2013 16:52

    SafeView™ Nucleic Acid Stain - 1 ml

    photo 0020986SafeView™ products represent a new and safe class of nucleic acid stains for the visualization of double-stranded DNA, single-stranded DNA, and RNA in agarose gels; a great alternative to more expensive SYBR® Safe or toxic Ethidium Bromide from other competitors. The dyes are developed to replace toxic Ethidium Bromide (EB, a potent mutagen), commonly used in gel electrophoresis for visualization of nucleic acids in agarose gels. SafeView™ products are non-carcinogenic by the Ames-test. The results are negative in both the mouse marrow chromophilous erythrocyte micronucleus and mouse spermary spermatocyte chromosomal aberration tests.

     

    PDF-IconDownload Datasheet

    Price: 66 Euro

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    Published in Top Products
    Wednesday, 15 May 2013 14:19

    NATtrol CT.NG Panel

    PRODUCT DESCRIPTION:
    NATtrol™ CT.NG Panel (NATCT.NGP-C) is formulated with purified, intact bacterial particles that have been chemically modified to render them non-infectious and refrigerator stable*. NATCT.NGP-C panel contains 17 x 1.2 mL vials each containing the bacterial NATtrol™ targets listed in the Expected Results. These controls are  supplied in a purified protein matrix that mimics the composition of a true clinical specimen. *NATtrol™ Patents Pending

    INTENDED USE:
    - NATtrol™ CT.NG Panel is designed to evaluate the performance of nucleic acid tests for determination of the presence bacterial DNA. NATCT.NGP-C can also be used for verification of clinical assays, development of diagnostic tests and training of laboratory personnel.
    - NATCT.NGP-C contains intact organisms and should be run in a manner identical to that used
    for clinical specimens.

    ETIOLOGIC STATUS/BIOHAZARD TESTING:
    - NATtrol™ inactivation was carried out on each member in the panel. The inactivation was verified by the absence of bacterial growth in a validated growth protocol.
    - The purified protein matrix was manufactured from materials that were screened and found to be negative for HIV 1&2 Ab, HBsAg, HTLV I&II Ab, HCV Ab, HIV RNA, HBV DNA and HCV RNA using FDA cleared kits at the single donor level.

    Catalog #: NATCT.NGP-C

    For more information download PDF file

    Published in Promos
    Wednesday, 15 May 2013 12:07

    NATtrol CT.NG External Run Controls

    PRODUCT DESCRIPTION:
    NATtrol™ CT.NG External Run Controls (NATCT (434)-6MC, NATNG-6MC and NATCT.NGNEG-6MC) are formulated with purified, intact bacterial particles that have been chemically modified to render them non-infectious and refrigerator stable*. Each control pack contains 6 x 1.0 mL vials of C.trachomatis NATtrolTM, N.gonorrhoeae NATtrolTM or CT.NG Negative NATtrolTM. These controls are supplied in a purified protein matrix that mimics the composition of a true clinical specimen. *NATtrol™ Patents Pending

    INTENDED USE:
    - NATtrol™ CT.NG External Run Controls are full process controls designed to evaluate the performance of nucleic acid tests for determination of the presence of CT.NG DNA. NATCT(434)-6MC, NATNG-6MC and NATCT.NGNEG-6MC can also be used for quality control of clinical assays and training of laboratory personnel.
    - NATCT(434)-6MC, NATNG-6MC and NATCT.NGNEG-6MC contain intact organisms and should be run in a manner identical to that used for clinical specimens.

    ETIOLOGIC STATUS/BIOHAZARD TESTING:
    - NATtrol™ inactivation was carried out on each control. The inactivation was verified by the absence of bacterial growth in a validated growth protocol.
    - The purified protein matrix was manufactured from materials that were screened and found to be negative for HIV 1&2 Ab, HBsAg, HTLV I&II Ab, HCV Ab, HIV RNA, HBV DNA and HCV RNA using FDA cleared kits at the single donor level.

    Catalog #:NATNG-6MC
    Catalog #:NATCT(434)-6MC
    Catalog #:NATCT.NGNEG-6MC

    For more information download PDF file

    Published in Promos
    Wednesday, 15 May 2013 11:16

    NATtrol BC.GP Panel

    PRODUCT DESCRIPTION:
    NATtrol™ BC.GP Panel (NATBC.GP-NNS) is formulated with purified, intact bacterial particles that have been chemically modified to render them non-infectious and refrigerator stable*. NATBC.GP-NNS contains 11 x 0.75 mL vials of bacterial NATtrol™ targets listed in Table 1. These panels are supplied in a purified protein matrix that mimics the composition of a true clinical specimen. *NATtrol™ Patents Pending

    INTENDED USE:
    - NATtrol™ BC.GP Panel is designed to evaluate the performance of nucleic acid tests for determination of the presence of bacterial nucleic acids. NATBC.GP-NNS can also be used for verification of clinical assays, development of diagnostic tests and training of laboratory personnel.
    - NATBC.GP-NNS contains intact organisms and should be run in a manner identical to that used for clinical specimens.

    ETIOLOGIC STATUS/BIOHAZARD TESTING:
    - NATtrol™ inactivation was carried out on the bacterial stock used to formulate panel members. The inactivation was verified by the absence of bacterial growth in a validated growth protocol.
    - The purified protein matrix was manufactured from materials that were screened and found to be negative for HIV 1&2 Ab, HBsAg, HTLV I&II Ab, HCV Ab, HIV RNA, HBV DNA and HCV RNA using FDA cleared kits at the single donor level.

    PRECAUTIONS:
    - Although NATBC.GP-NNS contains inactivated organisms, it should be handled as if potentially infectious.
    - Use Universal Precautions when handling this product.
    - To avoid cross-contamination, use separate pipette tips for all reagents.

    Catalog #: NATBC.GP-NNS 

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